How The Founders of AgeLess SPA Adjust to Daylight Saving Time

How The Founders of AgeLess SPA Adjust to Daylight Saving Time

Ahh, it’s that time of year again where we spring forward and lose an hour of sleep, which makes it hard to adjust to our day. But what if we didn’t let Daylight Saving Time (DST) ruin our routine while we adjust to the time change where it feels like we never get back that hour of sleep until we set our clocks back in the fall?

The founders, Michael and Michelle Cilip, of AgeLess SPA don’t let Daylight Saving Time affect them at all, though, and they can’t really have those kinds of hiccups with running a small business that is growing at an exceptional rate. So how exactly do they not let Daylight Saving Time get the best of them? The answer is quite simple.

The Cilips follow a certain trick that they got from SomnoMed, which includes making a plan, regulating your sleep pattern, staying conscious of your physical activity, creating an environment to sleep in, and avoiding the clock when it’s time to sleep. Find out more details below on how the Cilips follow this simple trick!

According to SomnoMed, the first step to do is plan on starting your adjustment to Daylight Saving the Saturday before Daylight Saving Time. This means to modify when you wake up and go to sleep by 15 minutes increments until Daylight Saving Time occurs. Once DST occurs, you will just have to wake up at your usual time or earlier, and already feel adjusted, as noted by SomnoMed.

The second step to follow is regulating your sleep pattern, according to SomnoMed. It’s important to make sure you go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day, including weekends. SomnoMed also suggest taking a nap for at least 20 minutes if that is an option for you and does not affect your sleep pattern at night if you are feeling very tired and feel you need more sleep.

The third step to follow is to have at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise, like walking outside when the sun is still out, about three times a week to help you sleep at night, according to SomnoMed. However, it’s important that this exercise takes place in the afternoon and not the evening before you go to sleep to not completely mess up your sleep pattern, according to SomnoMed.

The fourth and one of our favorite steps is to create a sleep environment you genuinely enjoy being and sleeping in, according to SomnoMed. It’s important to make sure the your room is dark and you have tools to drown out the outside light and noises. SomnoMed suggests using ear plugs, a white noise machine, or an eye mask. Additionally, SomnoMed suggests keeping your room between 60-75 F for a comfortable temperature to sleep in. And mostly importantly, SomnoMed suggests unplugging from the social media world and anything that has to do with electronics an hour before bed to unwind before you go to sleep (we might have to make this a habit for the rest of the year and not just for DST!)

Lastly, we know this may be hard for some people who tend to look at the clock, but SomnoMed suggests avoiding the clock and if you are unable to sleep then pick up a book or journal (not your smartphone or electronic device) to help you relax your mind to help you sleep.

The Cilips find this trick from SomoMed to be quite effective and they swear by it for when it’s time to start getting ready for a time change, so we hope this also helps you with your overall wellness needs!

Find more in-depth details on ways to adjust to Daylight Saving Time from SomnoMed here.

Inhale The Good, Exhale The Bad

Inhale The Good, Exhale The Bad

Please note: This post is from the archives of Samantha Schamel’s newsletter from 2016 and was edited slightly for AgeLess SPA.

It almost feels as though it should be a holiday to do something good for yourself, right? So go for it! Maybe it’s that skinny latte or massage you’ve been meaning to get.

Onward to our organ system!

This article is all about the lungs or the metal element. In Chinese medicine it is said that the lung ‘open’ to the nose (hello, sinuses and bronchitis), the health of your lungs is reflected in your skin, grief/sadness is the emotion, and white is the color. If there is phlegm -due to poor diet or too much dairy- in the body the lungs are the receptical. Two diseases of the lungs that are most common are dryness and phlegm.

Lung Dryness due to yin (substance) deficiency: dry chronic cough to the point of coughing up blood, shortness of breath, sore throat, dry skin, hot palms and soles, frequent thirst, flushed cheeks, periodic fever and could be due to chronic infection or inflammation of the lungs.

Foods to nourish the lungs: PEARS 🍐! Particularly steamed Asian pears with a little honey. This works so well with anyone who has a dry cough! Also, oranges, peaches, tofu, tempeh, flaxseed, butter and other dairy, eggs, oysters, clams and pork.

Phlegm in the lungs (typically a repletion that is possibly due to a deficiency: I mean think phlegm, thick or thin, productive to unproductive coughs, wheezing, asthma, shortness of breath if you have thick greasy tongue coating – you got phlegm!

Food to help transform phlegm: fennel, fenugreek, cayenne, watercress, horseradish, garlic, fresh ginger, radish, and herb base the mullein leaf. Typically avoiding foods such as dairy, meats, tofu, tempeh, soy and all sweeteners.

Another fun fact is the lungs and the large intestine are closely connected. So the next time you are bound up, try giving your nose a blow and see what happens!

Peace, love and a bear hug,

Acupuncture, What Is It Good For? Absolutely Everything!

Acupuncture, What Is It Good For? Absolutely Everything!

Please note: This post is from the archives of Samantha Schamel’s newsletter from 2016 and was edited slightly for AgeLess SPA.

Hey y’all! I am officially done with school and fully excited about the next big journey before me. I can finally say I am an acupuncturist and a herbalist. I have been practicing part-time with AgeLess Integrative Medical Spa in Horseheads and have been overwhelmed by the response in the community and so excited to be growing into a full-time gig.

However, I am here to tell you the wonderful things about Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) where acupuncture and herbal medicine are only two parts to this 5 part health system. Yes, acupuncture can treat a lot, from digestive issues to your everyday aches and pains, the acute situations to the chronic, common colds, flu, headaches, arthritis, dermatology (i.e. eczema, psoriasis, acne), labor preparation to anxiety and stress. Herbal medicine is great for all those things too and does a better job of nourishing and strengthening the body as well as battling some evils you have going on inside. Also, as a TCM practitioner, we also deal with diets, Qi Gong (I prefer my yoga), and bodywork.

TCM was originally developed to be a preventative medicine and in the classics, they say a person with no disease should have acupuncture four times a year when the seasons change so your body can remain healthy. Typically patients come to see me for pain or when a disease has set in the body and then my job is to create balance within the disharmony – and at times that is challenging depending on how long the patient has suffered with it.

If you have never tried acupuncture or afraid of looking like a porcupine, I promise it’s not bad at all! Many of my patients fall asleep on the warm bed and don’t even realize the needles are in. So if you have been curious or wanting to give it a shot, give the medical side of AgeLess SPA a call (607.846.3962).

As always, peace, love and a giant bear hug,

Chocolate Almond Butter Energy Bites Recipe from the Practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine at AgeLess Integrative Medical Spa

Chocolate Almond Butter Energy Bites Recipe from the Practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine at AgeLess Integrative Medical Spa

Ever hit the middle of the afternoon with a hankering for something sweet, but yet will satisfy you until dinner?

These energy bites have the sweetness and the natural source of protein to fill you up. Cinnamon and ginger will help regulate blood sugar so you don’t feel the crash you typically do after a candy bar or baked good.

These little energy bites are also great from a Traditional Chinese Medical perspective as well and particularly going into the winter season.

Dates are neutral and sweet. They help to nourish our bodies by strengthening our blood, helps with coughs, diarrhea, night sweats, weak digestion, and overall weakness. Black dates are also slightly warming which is great during the long winter months. Moderation is important because they can also create too much mucus in the body.

Almonds/almond butter are neutral and sweet. They help to relieve a cough, transform phlegm and lubricate the intestines. Almonds with the dates are a great combination to make sure the dates do not create congestion in the body.

Carob powder is warm and sweet. This is an excellent substitute for chocolate. Carob is naturally caffeine free and is great for soothing and calming the mind.

Cinnamon is hot, pungent and sweet. This spice is great for strengthening the stomach, warms any coldness internally, and helps stop pain. Cinnamon helps with the common cold, cold abdomen, and low back pain. Use in moderation when pregnant.

Ginger is warm and pungent. Ginger is excellent for the lungs and stomach and great for expelling common colds and coughs with clear mucus. Also, ginger is a great remedy for nausea and vomiting.

See how all these ingredients below can come together to make the ultimate energy bite!

Chocolate Almond Butter Energy Bites

1 cup pitted dates
½ cup almonds
¾ cup almond butter
2 Tbsp of carob powder or cacao powder
1 Tbsp of cinnamon
1 Tbsp of ginger

Add all ingredients to a food processor or blender
Blend until ingredients stick together
Energy bites can be formed into bite-size balls or spread onto a nonstick pan to make bars
Place in fridge or enjoy immediately!

If you want to make your energy bites anti-inflammatory try adding 1 Tbsp of Turmeric powder and ½ Tbsp of cayenne pepper instead of the cinnamon or ginger.

Want to learn more about Traditional Chinese Medicine or Acupuncture? Set up an appointment by requesting an appointment HERE.

– Samantha Schamel, Practitioner of Chinese Medicine